Dream Catcher

Part Two

Dream Catcher Part Two Read Part One

When we last left off, young Rose was captured by the Old Woman of the forest and held prisoner in a cave under an old, old tree....

"Try to escape and I'll catch you and eat you!" the Old Woman cackled, and so Rose did as she was told.

One day, while the Old Woman slept, Rose heard a small voice calling her name...

"Up here," said the voice, and Rose glanced up towards the entrance to the cave. There she saw a little man just a few inches tall. He had a long, pointy nose that stuck out from his green cape and hood. He looked like part of the earth and roots so Rose would not have seen him but for his madly waving arm.

"Oh, hello," said Rose, "Who are you?" "They call me Lucky," said the little green man with a twinkle in his eye. "Good luck comes to those who follow what I tell them. I'm here to help you, but you have to trust what I say." "Will you help me escape?" Rose cried fearfully as she watched the Old Woman snoring heavily in her bed.

"Listen carefully and do exactly as I say," said Lucky...

"In the cloth bag your father gave you is magic yarn that was given to your mother from the fairies. Every day when the Old Woman sleeps, you must weave it into a large web until it's seven feet high and seven feet wide. Keep the web on your bed as a blanket and when you sleep your dreams will weave themselves into the web. In seven days and seven nights I'll be back," said the little man. And with that he disappeared into the woods...

And so for seven days, as the Old Woman slept, Rose weaved her magical web. And at night Rose slept under her silvery blanket and wove magical dreams into her web. Rose's web was now complete and its brilliance made the whole room glow with shimmering moonlight.

"What's that glare?" the old Woman said, "It hurts my eyes!" "That's the moon shining across my bed," said Rose.

"There must be a hole letting the light in," grumbled the Old Woman, "It better be gone by morning or else!" she threatened. Then rubbing her eyes she climbed out from the cave and into the night...

Rose was frightened. How could she hide the web from the Old Woman? What if Lucky never returned? Just then she heard a familiar, small voice calling her name...

"You've done well Rose," said Lucky, "but there's no time to lose. It's a full moon tonight and the Old Woman will be back soon. Throw the end of your yarn up here and climb out."

Rose pulled out the last of the yarn and with Lucky's help, climbed out from the Old Woman's cave. Together they pulled up the dream web and Rose wrapped it around her like a blanket.

"Now be quick and follow me," said Lucky. And with that, the little green man disappeared into the forest...

Rose moved swiftly through the forest to keep up with the sprightly little man. Soon they arrived at a clearing in the woods. It had a stump in the centre covered in bits of fur, blood and bones. "The Old Woman will soon be here. Quick, throw your blanket up into the trees!" said Lucky. Rose threw the blanket as high as she could and it opened like a web, stretching across the clearing; it's silvery-blue yarn invisible in the moonlight.

Just then they heard branches snapping and the Old Woman came traipsing along, dragging a squealing pig by its tail. As she came into the clearing she let out a horrendous shout. The little pig, suddenly free, darted past Rose and disappeared into the woods. "Look!" said Lucky, "the Old Woman is caught in the web!"

It was a sight to see! The more the Old woman struggled, the tighter the yarn wound around her. Soon she was motionless but for her screeches and venom-filled rants.

"The sun is coming up and she can't live in the light," said Lucky. And sure enough, as the sun lit the clearing with its golden rays, the Old Woman began to melt until she disappeared completely from the web.

The woods came alive now that the Old Woman was dead. The birds sang and all the animals came out from hiding, bearing gifts of jewels, crystal and gold, and Rose filled her pockets with the treasures. Rose looked up at the web shimmering in the sunlight. In the centre was a a large circle or hole, like a window...

"Look through the web and tell me what you see," said Lucky. So Rose climbed up a tree and perched herself on a branch next to the web. "Oh it's beautiful!" exclaimed Rose. "It looks just like my dream!" "What do you see?" shouted Lucky, jumping up and down excitedly...

"The sky is the most brilliant blue... With little white clouds... Oh! I feel like I can almost reach out and touch one! There's a green meadow with flowers... Is it real?" asked Rose.

"It's your Dream Catcher," said Lucky. "You wove your dreams into the web as you slept. What else can you see?"

"There's a long, winding road with forest on either side," said Rose. "On the edge of the forest is a small, white house with a garden of beautiful roses. It looks like home!" Just then the door opened and a woman came out with a basket and began gathering roses from the garden. "That's your mother," said Lucky, who was now sitting next to Rose on the branch. "And look! There's your father!"

Rose instantly recognized her father coming out of the woods with his axe. Before she realized, Rose found herself calling out to him...

Rose's eyes welled with tears. "I want to be there more than anything," she cried. "Just close your eyes and imagine you are there. That's all you need to do," said Lucky. "Will you come with me?" said Rose. "No, my job is done," said Lucky. And with that he disappeared into the forest...

Rose closed her eyes and imagined her dream. She saw the little house, the red, yellow and white roses, her mother and father..., She could feel the warmth of the sun on her face. A tickle on her cheek made her open her eyes and a golden butterfly flew away. She followed it across the meadow...

Finally she came over a hill and saw the little white house with her mother and father in the garden. Overjoyed she called out to them and ran into their welcoming arms....

As they embraced, Rose's pockets emptied of all her treasures and they all three rejoiced and lived happily ever after until the end of their days.

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